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Table 2

Characteristics of six studies that investigated strategies taken by healthy BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers to reduce risk of ovarian cancer

StudyStudy populationLocation of studySample size of healthy mutation carriersMethod used to assess outcomeFollow-up periodChoice of risk reduction strategy
SurveillancePO
Botkin et al. (20) Females from an extended kindred known to carry a single BRCA1 mutation, recruited between 1995 and 1997, predominantly Mormons. Salt Lake City, UT, USA 26 In-person interview 12 months — — 
     24 months 54% (14) 46% (12) 
     Ages 25-39 71% (12) 29% (5) 
     Ages >40 22% (2) 78% (7) 
Lerman et al. (21) Females from an extended BRCA1- or BRCA2-linked families, enrolled in prospective cohort study from July 1994 to October 1997 Omaha, NE, USA 39 Telephone interview 12 months 87% (34) 13% (5) 
Lodder et al. (13) Females from families known to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer, who underwent genetic testing, Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University, from December 1995 to April 1998 Rotterdam, the Netherlands 26 In-person interview 12 months 50% (13) 50% (13) 
Meijers-Heijboer et al. (9) Females from families known to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, and with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer, who were seen at the Family Cancer Clinic and underwent BRCA1/2 testing, Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University, from Jan 1, 1994 to Jan 1, 1998 Rotterdam, the Netherlands 45 Clinical records 12 months 47% (21) 53% (24) 
     For entire study period (median = 21 months, range = 10.0-61.0) 36% (16) 64% (29) 
Scheuer et al. (2) Females who enrolled in one of three follow-up studies (one for those of Ashkenazi origin) and received genetic testing at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, from June 1, 1995 to October 31, 2000 New York, NY, USA 179 Telephone interview combined with clinical records and pathology reports Mean = 24.1 months, range = 1.6 -66.0 49% (89) 51% (90)* 
Schwartz et al. (22) Females from families with known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations who underwent free genetic testing through Lambardi Center Cancer Assessment and Risk Program from 1995 to 2000 Washington, DC, USA 79 Telephone interview 12 months 73% (58) 27% (21) 
StudyStudy populationLocation of studySample size of healthy mutation carriersMethod used to assess outcomeFollow-up periodChoice of risk reduction strategy
SurveillancePO
Botkin et al. (20) Females from an extended kindred known to carry a single BRCA1 mutation, recruited between 1995 and 1997, predominantly Mormons. Salt Lake City, UT, USA 26 In-person interview 12 months — — 
     24 months 54% (14) 46% (12) 
     Ages 25-39 71% (12) 29% (5) 
     Ages >40 22% (2) 78% (7) 
Lerman et al. (21) Females from an extended BRCA1- or BRCA2-linked families, enrolled in prospective cohort study from July 1994 to October 1997 Omaha, NE, USA 39 Telephone interview 12 months 87% (34) 13% (5) 
Lodder et al. (13) Females from families known to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer, who underwent genetic testing, Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University, from December 1995 to April 1998 Rotterdam, the Netherlands 26 In-person interview 12 months 50% (13) 50% (13) 
Meijers-Heijboer et al. (9) Females from families known to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, and with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer, who were seen at the Family Cancer Clinic and underwent BRCA1/2 testing, Department of Clinical Genetics, Erasmus University, from Jan 1, 1994 to Jan 1, 1998 Rotterdam, the Netherlands 45 Clinical records 12 months 47% (21) 53% (24) 
     For entire study period (median = 21 months, range = 10.0-61.0) 36% (16) 64% (29) 
Scheuer et al. (2) Females who enrolled in one of three follow-up studies (one for those of Ashkenazi origin) and received genetic testing at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, from June 1, 1995 to October 31, 2000 New York, NY, USA 179 Telephone interview combined with clinical records and pathology reports Mean = 24.1 months, range = 1.6 -66.0 49% (89) 51% (90)* 
Schwartz et al. (22) Females from families with known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations who underwent free genetic testing through Lambardi Center Cancer Assessment and Risk Program from 1995 to 2000 Washington, DC, USA 79 Telephone interview 12 months 73% (58) 27% (21) 
*

In an updated analysis, Kauff et al. (3) reported that 42% and 58% of carriers underwent surveillance and PO , respectively.

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