On November 8, 2023, the FDA approved fruquintinib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, -2, and -3, for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF therapy, and if RAS wild-type and medically appropriate, an anti-EGFR therapy. Approval was based on Study FRESCO-2, a globally conducted, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). The key secondary endpoint was progression-free survival. A total of 691 patients were randomly assigned (461 and 230 into the fruquintinib and placebo arms, respectively). Fruquintinib provided a statistically significant improvement in OS with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.55, 0.80; P < 0.001]. The median OS was 7.4 months (95% CI, 6.7, 8.2) in the fruquintinib arm and 4.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 5.8) for the placebo arm. Adverse events observed were generally consistent with the known safety profile associated with the inhibition of VEGFR. The results of FRESCO-2 were supported by the FRESCO study, a double-blind, single-country, placebo-controlled, randomized trial in patients with refractory mCRC who have been previously treated with fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy. In FRESCO, the OS HR was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.51, 0.83; P < 0.001). FDA concluded that the totality of the evidence from FRESCO-2 and FRESCO supported an indication for patients with mCRC with prior treatment with fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy, an anti-VEGF biological therapy, and if RAS wild-type and medically appropriate, an anti-EGFR therapy.

This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.