Background: High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) gene expression subtypes are associated with differential survival. We characterized HGSC gene expression in Black individuals and considered whether gene expression differences by self-identified race may contribute to poorer HGSC survival among Black versus White individuals. Methods: We included newly generated RNA-Seq data from Black and White individuals, and array-based genotyping data from four existing studies of White and Japanese individuals. We used K-means clustering, a method with no predefined number of clusters or dataset-specific features, to assign subtypes. Cluster- and dataset-specific gene expression patterns were summarized by moderated t-scores. We compared cluster-specific gene expression patterns across datasets by calculating the correlation between the summarized vectors of moderated t-scores. Following mapping to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-derived HGSC subtypes, we used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate subtype-specific survival by dataset. Results: Cluster-specific gene expression was similar across gene expression platforms and racial groups. Comparing the Black population to the White and Japanese populations, the immunoreactive subtype was more common (39% versus 23%-28%) and the differentiated subtype less common (7% versus 22%-31%). Patterns of subtype-specific survival were similar between the Black and White populations with RNA-Seq data; compared to mesenchymal cases, the risk of death was similar for proliferative and differentiated cases and suggestively lower for immunoreactive cases (Black population HR=0.79 [0.55, 1.13], White population HR=0.86 [0.62, 1.19]). Conclusions: While the prevalence of HGSC subtypes varied by race, subtype-specific survival was similar. Impact: HGSC subtypes can be consistently assigned across platforms and self-identified racial groups.

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