This study estimates the out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures for different cancer types among survivors with current vs no current cancer condition and across sex, which is understudied in the literature. This is a cross-sectional study of Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data for 2009-2018 where the primary outcome was the average per year OOP expenditure incurred by cancer survivors. Of 189 285 respondents, 15 010 (7.93%) were cancer survivors; among them, 46.28% had a current cancer condition. Average per year OOP expenditure for female survivors with a current condition of breast cancer ($1730), lung cancer ($1679), colon cancer ($1595), melanoma ($1783), non-Hodgkin lymphoma ($1656), nonmelanoma/other skin cancer (NMSC, $2118) and two or more cancers ($2310) were significantly higher than that of women with no history of cancer ($853, all P < .05). Similarly, average per year OOP expenditure for male survivors with a current condition of prostate cancer ($1457), lung cancer ($1131), colon cancer ($1471), melanoma ($1474), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma ($1653), NMSC ($1789), and bladder cancer ($2157) were significantly higher compared with the men with no history of cancer ($621, all P < .05). These differences persisted in survivors with no current cancer condition for breast cancer among women; prostate, lung, colon, and bladder cancer among men; and melanoma, NMSC, and two or more cancers among both sexes. OOP expenditure varied across cancer types and by sex for survivors with and without a current cancer condition. These findings highlight the need for targeted interventions for cancer survivors.

This content is only available via PDF.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview