Timely receipt of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening can reduce morbidity and mortality. This is the first known study to adopt Andersen's model of health services use to identify factors associated with CRC screening among US adults. The data from National Health Interview Survey from 2019 was utilized to conduct the analyses. Multivariable logistic regression was used to separately analyze data from 7,503 age-eligible women and 6,486 age-eligible men. We found similar CRC screening levels among men (57.7%) and women (57.6%). Factors associated with higher screening odds in women were older age, married/cohabitating with a partner, Black race, >bachelor's degree, having a usual source of care, and personal cancer history. Factors associated with lower odds for women were American Indian/Alaska Native race, living in the US for ≤10 years, ≤138% federal poverty level (FPL), uninsured or having Medicare, and in fair/poor health. For men, factors associated with higher screening odds were older age, homosexuality, married/cohabitating with a partner, Black race, >high school/general educational development education, having military insurance, having a usual source of care, and personal cancer history. Factors associated with lower odds for men were being a foreign-born US resident, living in the South or Midwest, ≤138% FPL, and being uninsured or having other insurance. Despite lower screening rates in the past, Black adults show a significantly higher likelihood of CRC screening than White adults; yet, screening disparities remain in certain other groups. CRC screening efforts should continue to target groups with lower screening rates to eliminate screening disparities.

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