The PI3K pathway regulates proliferation, survival, and metabolism and is frequently activated across human cancers. A comprehensive elucidation of how this signaling pathway controls transcriptional and co-transcriptional processes could provide new insights into the key functions of PI3K signaling in cancer. Here, we undertook a transcriptomic approach to investigate genome-wide gene expression and transcription factor (TF) activity changes, as well as splicing and isoform usage dynamics, downstream of PI3K. These analyses uncovered widespread alternatively spliced (AS) isoforms linked to proliferation, metabolism, and splicing in PIK3CA mutant cells, which were reversed by inhibition of PI3Kα. Analysis of paired tumor biopsies from PIK3CA-mutated breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with PI3Kα inhibitors identified widespread splicing alterations that affect specific isoforms in common with the preclinical models, and these alterations, namely PTK2/FRNK and AFMID isoforms, were validated as functional drivers of cancer cell growth or migration. Mechanistically, isoform-specific splicing factors mediated PI3K-dependent RNA splicing. Treatment with splicing inhibitors rendered breast cancer cells more sensitive to the PI3Kα inhibitor alpelisib, resulting in greater growth inhibition than alpelisib alone. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of widespread splicing alterations driven by oncogenic PI3K in breast cancer. The atlas of PI3K-mediated splicing programs establishes a key role for the PI3K pathway in regulating splicing, opening new avenues for exploiting PI3K signaling as a therapeutic vulnerability in breast cancer.

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