Introduction: Skin cancers are one of the most common cancers in the United States with melanoma being the fifth leading cause of cancer. Despite its increasing incidence, there are limited studies on how skin cancer affects different races and ethnicities. Here, we conduct a population-based registry study to derive incidence and survival patterns of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) in the US from 2006-2017. 17 population-based cancer registries from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute were reviewed. A total of 58,666 cases with histologically confirmed cases of cutaneous malignant melanoma were evaluated. Surprisingly, the CMM subtype that was predominantly found in the non-Hispanic whites (56%) and Hispanic whites (45%) was acral lentiginous melanoma, while “other” melanomas were predominant in the Asian (54%) and Black (77%) populations. Superficial spreading and lentigo maligna melanomas presented more commonly in men (69% and 63%). In addition, nodular and lentigo maligna melanomas had the poorest survival rates and had a median survival of 26 and 21 months.

Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) of the National Cancer Institute was used to calculate the incidence, proportion, and survival data. 58,66 histologically confirmed CMM cases reported by the 17 cancer registries from 2006-2017 were used. The 17 registries include 14 states (Alaska, greater and California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Utah, Washington) and 4 standard metropolitan areas (Los Angeles, San Francisco-Oakland, and San Jose-Monterey, California; and Seattle-Puget Sound, Washington). Cases of the 4 major CMM subtypes as well as the “other” subtypes were identified using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-0-3) morphology code.

Conclusion and future direction: CMM has been steadily increasing in incidence within the US. Moreover, the incidence rate of CMM in the Hispanic population has been rising. It is important that we continue to assess the epidemiological characteristics and trends of CMM subtypes in the US and increase awareness of skin cancer and its preventative measures in the Hispanic population. In addition, future studies should analyze the genetic and environmental factors that may be contributing to observed incidence rates in the Hispanic population.

Citation Format: Yae Kye, Luis Alvarado, Alok Dwivedi, Jessica Chacon. Investigating incidence and survival patterns of cutaneous malignant melanoma in the United States from 2006-2017 [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2021; 2021 Apr 10-15 and May 17-21. Philadelphia (PA): AACR; Cancer Res 2021;81(13_Suppl):Abstract nr 796.