Tumor targeting by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can be enhanced by (a) increasing the percentage of injected dose taken up by the tumor and/or (b) increasing the tumor:nontumor ratios. Several groups have demonstrated that one can increase tumor to nontumor ratios by the use of antibody fragments or the administration of second antibodies. Several other modalities are also possible: (a) the use of recombinant interferons to up-regulate the expression of specific tumor associated antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen or TAG-72 on the surface of carcinoma cells and thus increase MAb tumor binding has proved successful in both in vitro and in vivo studies; (b) the intracavitary administration of MAbs. Recent studies have demonstrated that when radiolabeled B72.3 is administered i.p. to patients with carcinoma of the peritoneal cavity, it localizes tumor masses with greater efficiency than does concurrent i.v. administered antibody. Studies involving the comparative pharmacology of intracavitary administration of radiolabeled MAb in patients and several animal models will be discussed; (c) it has been reported that prior exposure of hepatoma to external beam radiation will increase radiolabeled MAb tumor targeting. We and others have not been able to duplicate this phenomenon with a human colon cancer xenograft model and radiolabeled MAbs to two different colon carcinoma associated antigens. The possible reasons for these differences will be discussed; (d) the cloning and expression of recombinant MAbs with human constant regions and subsequent size modification constructs will also undoubtedly alter the pharmacology of MAb tumor binding in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

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Presented at the “Second Conference on Radioimmunodetection and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer,” September 8–10, 1988, Princeton, NJ.

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