Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The type I somatomedin receptor (SR), expressed in these cells, may mediate the mitogenic effects of these peptides. We have examined the effect of type I SR blockade on human breast cancer growth with a monoclonal antibody (α-IR3) that blocks the receptor binding domain. α-IR3 inhibited binding of 125I-IGF-I in all breast cancer cell lines tested. Binding affinity of α-IR3 was 2 to 5 times higher than that of IGF-I in MDA-231 (Kd 2.1 nm) and MCF-7 cells (Kd 0.6 nm), respectively. In the presence of 10% calf serum, the antibody inhibited anchorage-independent growth of six of seven breast cancer cell lines. This inhibition was reversible with excess IGF-I. In serum-free medium, α-IR3 blocked IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis in four of four breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR75-1, MDA-231, and HS578T). However, the antibody did not inhibit basal growth of any of the breast cancer cell lines in serum-free conditions. In three estrogen receptor-positive, estrogen-responsive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, ZR75-1, and T47D), type I SR blockade with α-IR3 failed to block estrogen-stimulated DNA synthesis or cell proliferation, indicating that secreted IGF activity is not the sole mediator of the growth effects of estrogen. In conclusion, antibody-mediated type I SR blockade does not inhibit basal growth of breast cancer cells under serum-free conditions, arguing against a critical autocrine role of endogenously secreted IGF activity in vitro. However, type I SR blockade inhibits breast cancer cell growth in the presence of serum, suggesting that serum IGFs might be critical endocrine or paracrine regulators of human breast cancer.

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Supported in part by NIH Grants R01 CA 30251 and P01 30195 and by a Veterans Administration Career Development Award.

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