Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in adults in the United States. Despite compelling evidence of improved outcomes in CRC, screening rates are not optimal. This study aimed to characterize CRC screening trends over the last two decades and assess the impact of various screening modalities on overall CRC screening rates. Using National Health Interview Survey data from 2005-2021, we examined CRC screening (colonoscopy, mt-sDNA, FOBT/FIT, sigmoidoscopy, CT Colonography) rates among adults aged 50-75 years (n = 85,571). A pseudo-time-series cross-sectional (pseudo-TSCS) analysis was conducted including a random effects GLS regression model to estimate the relative impact of each modality on changes in CRC screening rates. Among 50–75-year-olds, the estimated CRC screening rate increased from 47.7% in 2005 to 69.9% in 2021, with the largest increase between 2005 and 2010 (47.7% to 60.7%). Rates subsequently plateaued until 2015 but increased from 63.5% in 2015 to 69.9% in 2018. This was primarily driven by the increased use of mt-sDNA (2.5% in 2018 to 6.6% in 2021). Pseudo-TSCS analysis results showed that mt-sDNA contributed substantially to the increase in overall screening rates (77.3%; p < 0.0001) between 2018-2021. While CRC screening rates increased from 2005 to 2021, they remain below the 80% goal. The introduction of mt-sDNA, a non-invasive screening test may have improved overall rates. Sustained efforts are required to further increase screening rates to improve patient outcomes and offering a range of screening options is likely to contribute to achieving this goal.

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