Hematopoiesis governs the generation of immune cells through the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) into various progenitor cells, a process controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Among extrinsic factors influencing hematopoiesis is the microbiota, or the collection of microorganisms present in various body sites. The microbiota has a profound impact on host homeostasis by virtue of its ability to release various molecules and structural components, which promote normal organ function. In this review, we will discuss the role of microbiota in influencing hematopoiesis and how disrupting the microbiota/host network could lead to hematologic malignancies, as well as highlight important knowledge gaps to move this field of research forward.

Significance:

Microbiota dysfunction is associated with many pathologic conditions, including hematologic malignancies. In this review, we discuss the role of microbiota in influencing hematopoiesis and how disrupting the microbiota/host network could lead to hematologic malignancies. Understanding how the microbiota influences hematologic malignancies could have an important therapeutic impact for patients.

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